Homepage Aboutus Editorial Board Instruction Contents Subcribe Feedback
 


Abstract July 2010

Abstract 2010
+ Abstract January - April 2010
+ Abstract July 2010

 

ABSTRACTS IJBB VOLUME 7 NO. 3. JULY 2010

A TRIBUTE TO PROF. DR. SYED ABDUL QADIR JUNAIDI: A PIONEER ECOLOGIST OF PAKISTAN

Moinuddin Ahmed and Syed Sadruddin Hussain

Laboratory of Dendrochronology and Plant Ecology of Pakistan, Dept. of Botany, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Gulshan-e-Iqbal Campus, Karachi-75300, Pakistan

A tribute to Prof. Dr. Abdul Qadir Junaidi: a pioneer ecologist of Paksitan is written and a brief history of ecological works done in Pakistan is given.

STATUS OF VEGETATION ANALYSIS IN PAKISTAN

1Moinuddin Ahmed, 2Syed Shahid Shaukat and 3D. Khan

1Laboratory of Dendrochronology and Plant Ecology of Pakistan, Dept. of Botany, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Gulshan-e-Iqbal Campus, Karachi-75300, Pakistan
2Institute of Environmental Studies, University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan
3Department of Botany, Government National College, Karachi, Pakistan

ABSTRACT

History of vegetation analysis and description is discussed. Vegetation analysis in Pakistan may be divided into 5 periods i.e., observational, quantitative Phytosociological, multivariate analysis (ordination), population dynamics and modern multivariate and numerical techniques. It is observed that period of observational analysis of the vegetation lasts until around 1970; however in Karachi University quantitative research was started in early sixties. The use of multivariate analysis (ordination) was initiated in 1968 in Karachi University while studies on population dynamics of forest tree species were started in 1986 from Balochistan University. Until year 2000, applying multivariate techniques to vegetation analysis were confined to the Karachi University. Now workers from various Universities are applying multivariate or numerical techniques for vegetation analysis. However still, these techniques are not as commonly used as they should be.

DENDROCHRONOLOGICAL POTENTIAL OF GYMNOSPERMIC SPECIES OF PAKISTAN

Moinuddin Ahmed, Muhammad Wahab and Nasrullah Khan

Laboratory of Dendrochronology and Plant Ecology of Pakistan.
Department of Botany, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Gulshan-e-Iqbal Campus Karachi, Pakistan

ABSTRACT

This paper encircles an extensive survey of wood sampling of different pine species from sub-alpine to moist, dry temperate and sub tropical region of Northern mountain system of Pakistan. Wood samples of Abies pindrow Royle, Cedrus deodara (Roxb. Ex Lamb), Picea smithiana (Wall) Boiss., Pinus gerardiana Wall Ex Lamb.G. Don Pinus roxburghii Sargent and Pinus wallichiana A.B Jackson were obtained from 52 different locations. The main purpose of this sampling was to locate suitable sites and sensitive tree species which could be used for applied Dendrochronological research in Pakistan. Age and growth rates of various species are presented. It is shown that despite some problems cross-dating is possible in all species. It is also presented that in many individual narrow rings are appeared in similar calendar years in different species, showing strong climate signals. On the basis of these studies it is suggested that except Pinus roxburghii Sargent all species show sensitive rings if sampled from extreme sites and could be used for applied Dendrochronological investigations.

A QUANTITATIVE DESCRIPTION OF MOIST TEMPERATE CONIFER FORESTS OF HIMALAYAN REGION OF PAKISTAN AND AZAD KASHMIR

1Muhammad Faheem Siddiqui, 1Moinuddin Ahmed, 1Nasrullah Khan and 2Imran Ahmed Khan

1Laboratory of Dendrochronology and Plant Ecology of Pakistan, Department of Botany, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology ,Gulshan-e-Iqbal, Karachi.
2Government Degree Science/Commerce College Landhi/Korangi, Karachi 74900.

ABSTRACT

The present study is based on the examination of quantitative vegetation description of moist temperate conifer forests of Himalayan region of Pakistan. Forty one stands at five different locations from Himalayan Region of Pakistan were chosen for the study. The underlying group in the vegetation was exposed using Ward’s cluster analysis. The three groups derived from cluster analysis were superimposed on principal component analysis (PCA) ordination axes. Three main groups were clearly separated out on ordination plane (axis 1 and 2) Group I was dominated by Pinus wallichiana stands, group II was dominated by Abies pindrow while group III was composed of Cedrus deodara dominating stands. The relationships between environmental factors and vegetation were examined. Environmental variables generally showed no significant relation with ordination axes, among the environmental variables only elevation showed significant correlation with the ordination axes suggesting that the altitudinal gradient has an overriding role in the composition of vegetation. Moist temperate forests are highly disturbed due to anthropogenic causes. Some recommendations are proposed for the improvement and future research in these forests.

SIZE CLASS STRUCTURE AND REGENERATION POTENTIAL OF MONOTHECA BUXIFOLIA (FALC.) A. DC. DOMINATED FORESTS DISTRICT DIR LOWER PAKISTAN

Nasrullah Khan, Moinuddin Ahmed, Muhammad Wahab and Kanwal Nazim

Laboratory of Plant Ecology and Dendrochronology, Department of Botany Federal Urdu University of Arts Science & Technology Karachi Pakistan
Corresponding author: nasrullahdushkheli@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

This study deals with structure, dynamics and regeneration potential of Monotheca buxifolia and associated tree species. Fifteen stands at different locations in district Dir Hindukush range of Pakistan were chosen for the study. Point centered quarter method for trees and 5×5m size quadrats were used for sampling of understorey vegetation including shrubs, seedlings and saplings respectively. Size class structure and regeneration potential of Monotheca buxifolia and associated tree species, were examined that reflect the dynamics of species and consequently the forests where it dominates. The arboreal vegetation was mostly dominated by broad leaved species including Monotheca buxifolia, Olea ferruginea, Acacia modesta, Punica granatum, Quercus baloot and Ficus palmata. The understorey vegetation composed of Dodonea viscosa, Justicia adhatoda, Otostegia limbata, Indigofera gerardiana, Plantago lanceolata, Rumex dentatus, Marrubium vulgaris, Fragaria nubicola, Geranium rotundifolium, Daphne oleoides, Solanum nigram, Ajuga bracteosa, Oxalis corniculata seedlings of Monotheca buxifolia, Quercus baloot and Punica granatum. At the seedling and sapling stage, maximum number was observed for Monotheca buxifolia (27±5.75 and 38±7.1) followed by Quercus baloot (18±2.2 and 12±1.0) and Olea ferruginea. As for as regeneration status is concerned, 34% species show good regeneration, 50% species were facing the problem of poor regeneration while, only 16% species were not regenerating. Size class structure of Monotheca buxifolia and associated tree species for individual stands exhibited a few gaps. Relationships between density and basal area were significant but density and basal area with altitudinal and slope gradient showed non significant relation. Some recommendations are outlined for future research and sustainable management of these forests species.

FLORISTIC AND PHYTO-SOCIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF VEGETATION OF KEENJHAR LAKE AND SURROUNDING AREA (THATTA, SINDH), PAKISTAN

Ghulam Akbar1, Surayya Khatoon2, M. Imran 2, Nuzhat Rizwan3, Muhammad Zafar Khan3 and Sadul Islam4

Indus for All Programme, WWF-Pakistan. Karachi.
2 Department of Botany, University of Karachi.Karachi -75270, Pakistan.
3 WWF-Pakistan. Karachi
4Chotiari Wetland Complex, WWF-Pakistan. Sanghar.

ABSTRACT

Keenjhar Lake is one of the major fresh water reservoirs located at Thatta district of Sindh province, spread on area of about 140 km2. It has been designated as Ramsar site in 1976 and a wildlife sanctuary in 1977. The Lake is a vital wetland area of great ecological, biological and economic significance. It is a major source of domestic and industrial water supplies to Karachi metropolitan. It is an important breeding and wintering area for a wide variety of birds, reptiles and mammals. Local communities especially fishermen are dependent on this important wetland for their sustenance. A detailed study was undertaken by “the Indus for All Programme of WWF-Pakistan” during 2006, 2007 and 2008 to record and document floral diversity and delineate the plant communities in and around Keenjhar Lake. A total of 7 plant communities were identified which represent a variety of habitats around the Keenjhar Lake. Significant findings during the survey included Luffa echinata, Populus euphratica, and Tamarix sarenensis which were recorded for the first time at this site. A new Sporobolous species was also documented which is a new addition to our knowledge. Keenjhar Lake exhibits a variety of habitats due to the presence of freshwater and its surrounding sandy, rocky and hilly areas. The small hills in the vicinity of Lake present an entirely different flora compared to that found in the low lying areas near water margins. In spite of being a freshwater Lake, patches of saline land are present at various points of its periphery that add to habitat diversity. The study presents the floristic and phytosociological details of Keenjhar lake area.

VEGETAION STUDIES OF SELECTED GRAVEYARDS OF UPPER SWAT

1Siraj Ahmad, 2Nasrullah Khan, 2Muhammad Wahab and 2Kanwal Nazim

1Department of Botany, Post Graduate Jahanzeb College, Swat Pakistan
2Department of Botany Federal Urdu University Gulshan-e-Iqbal campus Karachi Pakistan

ABSTRACT

The present study deals with the phytosociological analysis of the selected graveyards of Upper Swat. Seven conserved graveyards were sampled and various ecological attributes were obtained. Based on IVI seven different communities were identified, representing 54 families and 95 species. Out of these 95 species 50 species were herbs, 25 shrubs and 20 were trees respectively. The findings show that the vegetation of the selected graveyards is comparatively less disturbed and the floristic composition is different from elsewhere due to religious sanctities. Therefore, it is recommended that these natural forests should be conserved by government agencies involving local communities.

A PHYTOSOCIOLOGICAL STUDY OF PINE FORESTS FROM DISTRICT DIR, PAKISTAN

1Muhammad Wahab, 1Moinuddin Ahmed, 1Nasrullah Khan and 2Atta Mohammad Sarangzai

1Department of Botany, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science & Technology ,Gulshan-e-Iqbal Campus, Karachi 75300, Pakistan.
2Department of Botany, University of Balochistan, Quetta, Pakistan
*Author’s E-mail: m_wahabdir@yahoo.com,

ABSTRACT

Phytosociological study was conducted in pine forests throughout district Dir. Point centered quadrate method was used for sampling and twenty five pine forests were sampled between elevation ranges 1400-2672 meters above mean sea level. Phytosociological attributes (frequency, density, basal area, importance value) and absolute values (Density.ha-1 and Basal area m2ha-1) were calculated for each species and the forest respectively. A total of six pine tree species belonging to 2 families and 5 genera were recorded from various stands at different altitudes, exposure and degree of slopes. Among the tree species Cedrus deodara (Roxb. Ex Lamb) G.Don was the dominant tree species recorded in fourteen stands followed by Pinus wallichiana A.B. Jackson which showed presence in eight stands. Abies pindrow Royle, and Picea smithiana (Wall.) Boiss were recorded from high elevation and occurred in three and six stands respectively. Lower elevation supports Pinus roxburghii Sargent forests while Taxus wallichiana (Zucc.) was rarely associated with deodar only in one stand. It was recorded that most of the forest stands exhibited open canopies due to the over exploitation of forests for timber purposes. Ten communities were recognized based on the importance values and floristic composition of the stands. Pinus wallichiana- Deodar Community was the most widely distributed community of the study area.

IMPACT OF FENCING ON VEGETATION STRUCTURE IN LEHRI AND JINDI SUB-MOUNTAINOUS OPEN SCRUB FOREST

Tahira Nawaz1, Mansoor Hameed*1, Nargis Naz1, M. Sajid Aqeel Ahmad1, Abdul Aleem Chaudhry2

1Department of Botany, University iof Agriculture, Faisalabad
2Punjab Wildlife and Parks Department, 2-Sanda Road, Lahore, Pakistan
E-mail: hameedmansoor@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Lehri and Jindi Reserve Forest is about 6 km from Dina on a way to Rawalpindi. Total area of these two forests is about 80 sq km. Their habitat is suitable for many important wildlife species including game birds and mammals. Vegetation assessment survey was conducted in October 2007 to explore the present state of biodiversity at Lehri & Jindi forest area. Vegetation cover is about 60 %. Trees and large shrubs contributes only 20-30 % of the cover. Plant diversity is astonishingly high; over 140 species were recorded during a single season survey belonging to 46 families. There was a significant difference in vegetation structure between fenced and non-fenced areas in the forest.

THE DIVERSITY OF CRABS IN SOME MANGROVE FORESTS OF KARACHI, PAKISTAN

Kanwal Nazim1, Moinuddin Ahmed2, Muhammad Uzair Khan1, Nasrullah Khan and S.Shahid Shaukat3

1Department of Zoology, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Karachi.
2Department of Botany, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Karachi.
3Institute of Environmental Studies, Department of Botany, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270, Pakistan
Author’s e-mail:fuuast.kanwal@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Pakistan has enormous coastal resources along its southern border. Due to the geographical position and climatic condition, the coastal area of the country is known as one of the highly productive areas of the world. Along the coastal belt there is a chain of unique mangrove forests which consists of distinctive ecosystem. A survey was conducted in three different mangrove forests located at Sandspit, Port Qasim and Agra Taj during March 2008 to August 2009 with a view to assess the status of crab in these areas. The study was conducted on the distribution and species diversity. A total of ten species of crabs were recorded from the area namely Uca sp., Uca annulipes, Uca urvelli, Macropthalmus depressus, Metapograpsus thukuhar, Scylla serreta, Sesarma lanatum, Sesarma plicatum, Sesarma sp. and Heteropanope glabra belonging to four families Ocypodidae, Mennipidae, Portunidae, Grapsidae and Pilumnidae. The small crab species Heteropanope glabra was highly abundant species of mangrove forests while Sesarma lanatum was found to be rare in all the localities. The results showed Sandspit area to have highest values of diversity indices the species richness (1.92), Diversity (2.13), Evenness (0.92) and least value of dominance (0.09) compared with other localities. Morphometric measurements showed that Scylla serrata grows to relatively higher carapace area8.5 cm2 whereas rest of the species possessed carapace length upto 1.1 cm.

APPLICATION OF TREE RINGS IN EARTHQUAKE STUDIES IN PAKISTAN

Tasveer Zahra Bokhari1, Zaheer-ud-Din Khan2, Moin-ud-Din Ahmed3, Nasrullah Khan3 and Nadeem Ullah2

1 Botany Division IP&AB, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan, Pakistan
2 Botany Department, GC University, Lahore, Pakistan
3 Laboratory of Dendrochronology and Plant Ecology, Department of Botany, FUUAST, Gulshan-e-Iqbal Campus, Karachi, Pakistan
ABSTRACT

The present study reports the dendroseismological potential of pine tree species including Pinus wallichiana, Picea smithiana, Abies pindrow, Pinus roxburghii, Cedrus deodara. A total of 261 cores from 213 trees were sampled from different areas of Azad Jammu and Kashmir. These samples were processed following the standard dendrochronological techniques described by Stockes & Smiley (1965). The preliminary results revealed that these tree samples exhibit great age and show sensitivity to the environment. These are preliminary results which would be helpful to determine the dendroseismological potential of these trees and sites of the study area.

ASSEMBLAGE DIVERSITY AND MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS OF INSECTS AND ARACHNIDS FROM SANDSPIT MANGROVE FORESTS AVICENNIA MARINA FORSK

1Kanwal Nazim, 2Moinuddin Ahmed, 1Muhammad Uzair Khan, 3S. Shahid Shaukat, 1Syed Kamaluddin and 2Nasrullah Khan

1Department of Zoology, Federal Urdu University Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan
2Department of Botany, Federal Urdu University Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan
3Institute of Environmental Studies, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270, Pakistan
Author’s e-mail:fuuast.kanwal@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

The study deals with population diversity and multivariate analysis of insects and spiders of Sandspit mangrove forest dominated by grey mangrove Avicennia marina. In order to get informations about the seasonal variations and the distribution of insects and arachnids of Sandspit mangrove forest monthly data was collected from 2007 to 2008. A total of 33 species of insects and arachnids were recorded. Among them 28 species associated with class insecta; most of the species belong to orders Diptera. Only six species of spiders were recorded from the study area belonging to five families. Few insects are biting type causing irritation and pain to the human being; however they live frequently in the mangrove forests. Species diversity (H') of class insecta species is 1.406 while species richness and evenness were 0.422 and 7.02 respectively. Species diversity (H’), Species richness, evenness and dominance of Arachnida species are1.212, 0.753, 1.020 and 0.365 respectively. The Dendrogram resulting from Ward s clustering strategy shows no clear cut grouping due to chaining effect of taxa. The pattern of species on the ordination axes were disclose on monthly basis.

THREATENED AND ENDANGERED NATIVE PLANTS OF KARACHI

Syed Sadruddin Hussain, Moinuddin Ahmed, Muhammad Faheem Siddiqui and Muhammad Wahab

Laboratory of Dendrochronology and Plant Ecology of Pakistan,
Department of Botany, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Gulshan-e-Iqbal Campus Karachi, Pakistan
*Corresponding Author: sadruddin_fuuast@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

In order to compile a “red data book” and to determine the threatened status of native plants of Karachi, a regular fortnightly visits were undertaken during 2009-2010. During this study, exotic plants, ruderals, weeds and naturalized species were not taken into consideration. For our study “Flora of Karachi” by S. M. H. Jafri (1966) was considered as base line. In that flora 403 species belonging to 72 families were included. According to our observation 135 species were assessed in threatened plants, out of them 8 species have already become extinct from our study area which also include Tecomella undulata, a tree with gorgeous flowers. Ten species are included as endangered plants, 25 plants belong to rare species while 28 species belong to vulnerable species. Prosopis juliflora and Eucalyptus citriodora are invasive species. In order to draw the attention about the threatened plants 20 photographs are presented. It is recommended that we should not destroy our native plants and should not regard them as nuisance or unwanted plants, instead we should conserve the wilderness and wild plants to preserve the species diversity and gene pool of our area. Autecologies of wild plants should be studied and ways and means should be developed to preserve them.

AN ETHNOBOTANICAL STUDY ON THE USAGE OF WILD MEDICINAL HERBS FROM MALANA HILLS, PARACHINAR KURRAM VALLEY

Lalbadshah, Mohammad Ibrar and Farrukh Hussain

Department Of Botany University Of Peshawar Pakistan
Author’s e-mail:badshahmasood1@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

An ethnobotanical survey was carried out in the territory of lower mountain in Malana of Parachinar which is characterized by great plant diversity. In total 41 wild species from 28 families and a few plant preparations for use in human therapy were recorded. The most commonly used plants for medicinal purposes in variety of ailements were Mentha longifolia, Seripedium kurramensis, Thymus serpyllum, Artemisia absynthium and Berberis lyceum.. The most frequently reported medicinal uses were for treating gastrointestinal ailments(37.5%), skin and external wound (25%), followed by urinogenital, respiratory and cardiovascular problems (15%, 7.5% and 5%) respectively. Plants with un certain uses were Tanecetum artemesoids and Urtica dioca . While plants with interesting but lesser known properties were Rumex chalepensis (used against Urtica dioca stings). In addition 4 species were used as veterinary medicine.

ETHNO-VETERINARY STUDY OF MARGHAZAR VALLEY

1Siraj Ahmad Yousfzai, 2Nasrullah Khan 1Ajmal Iqbal, 2Muhammad Wahab and 2Faheem Siddiqui

1Department of Botany, Post Graduate Jahanzeb College, Swat Pakistan
2Department of Botany, Federal Urdu university Karachi Pakistan.

ABSTRACT

An Ethno-veterinary study was conducted in the Marghazar Valley, district Swat Pakistan during summer 2006. A total of 49 Ethno veterinary important plant species were found to belong to 49 genera and 35 families. Among these families the largest family was Lamiaceae, having 5 species, the second largest family was Asteraceae having 4 species.

EFFECT OF INDUSTRIAL WASTE ON SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY AND SEED GERMINATION OF DIFFEENT PLANT SPECIES

1Muhammad Uzair Khan, 2Moinuddin Ahmed, 1Kanwal Nazim, 3S.Shahid Shaukat and 2Nasrullah Khan

1Department of Zoology, Federal Urdu University Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan
2Department of Botany, Federal Urdu University Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan
3Institute of Environmental Studies and Department of Botany, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270, Pakistan
Corresponding author’s e-mail m_uzairjoji@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

The study was undertaken in greenhouse to investigate the effects of industrial waste on seed germination, speed of germination and fungal activities. Three types of industrial waste (i.e. fiber industry sludge, chemical industry sludge and marble waste powder) were used for this experiment. Six treatments were made using 20g quantities of industrial waste in each treatments. The treatments were made, as control, T1= fiber industry sludge, T2= fiber industry sludge-ash, T3= chemical industry sludge, T4= chemical industry sludge-ash and T5= marble waste powder. Two series of plants species were selected, including five crops species Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek, Pisum sativum L., Vigna mungo (L.)Hepper, Phaseolus lunatus L. and Lens culineris Medic, while five wild (or naturalized) plant species Cynodon dactylon (L)Pers., Azadirachta indica (L.) A. Juss., Parkinsonia aculeata L., Prosopis Juliflora (Swartz) DC. and Lactuca remotiflora DC. The germination was recorded on alternate days. The soil samples from each treatment were collected to check the fungal activities. The results revealed that all plant species were suppressed in all the treatments compared with controls. The percentage of seed germination and speed of germination of Phaseolus lunatus and Lactuca remotiflora were suppressed in all treatments. Two fungal species Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus were recorded from all treatments. No significant differences were found between these two species and among all treatments.

GROWTH OF SAMANEA SAMAN (JACQ.) MERR. IN DIFFERENT SOILS OF INDUSTRIAL AREAS OF KARACHI

M. Kabir and M. Zafar Iqbal

Department of Botany, University of Karachi, Karachi, 75270, Pakistan
E.mail: kabir_botany82@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

The growth of Samanea saman was investigated in a green house in different soils of industrial areas (Sindh Industrial Trading Estate) of Karachi. The seedlings of S. saman which were grown in polluted soils of different industrial areas showed variation in many growth variables like root, shoot, seedling length, plant cover, leaf area, root, shoot, leaf dry weight, total plant dry weight, and various ratios as compared to plants grown in soil of University Campus. There was reduction in root, shoot, leaf and total plant dry weight of S. saman in Pakistan metal industry, Dalda Limited and Indus battery soil while, increase in root, shoot, and seedling length, plant cover and leaf area were observed in these industrial soils as compared to seedlings grown in University Campus soil. The industrial areas soils especially the Shafi tannery increased the growth variables of S. saman as compared to University Campus and other industrial soils. The soil of industrial areas was sandy clay loam to sandy and silt loam with high bulk density and chloride contents, low porosity, electrical conductivity and total dissolved salt, alkaline pH, high sulphur, sodium and potassium (except for Shafi tannery), as compared to University Campus soil which was clay-loam in texture. Highest amount of total dissolved salts and electrical conductivity was found in the soil of Indus battery followed by University Campus, Pakistan metal industry, Dalda limited and Shafi tannery.

GROWTH OF THESPESIA POPULNEA (L.) SOLAND. EX CORREA IN SOILS OF KORANGI AND LANDHI INDUSTRIAL AREAS OF KARACHI, PAKISTAN

Syed Atiq-ur-Rehman 1 and Muhammad Zafar Iqbal 2

Department of Botany, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270, Pakistan
Email’s: 1 atiq_falcon7663@yahoo.com,
2 mziqbalbotuokpk@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

The growth of Thespesia populnea (L.) Soland. ex Correa, was studied in soils collected from Khan Towel, Tanveer Garment, One Tech Rubber and One Tech Ply Board factories in the vicinity of Korangi and Landhi industrial areas. A numbers of growth parameters were higher in almost all of the industrial locations soils mainly of One Tech Ply Board factory soil, Tanveer Garment, Khan Towel and One Tech Rubber factory soils, respectively as compared to Karachi University soil. One Tech Ply Board factory soil fairly increased several growth properties like plant height, number of leaves, plant cover, shoot length, leaf area, root, shoot, leaf and total plant dry weights, specific leaf area and leaf area ratio whereas root, seedling length and root/shoot ratio were substantially enhanced in the treatment of Tanveer Garment factory soil. One Tech Rubber and Khan Towel factories soils raised a large number of growth parameters such as plant height, leaves number, plant cover, root, shoot and seedling length, leaf area, root, shoot, leaf and total plant dry weights, root/shoot ratio and specific leaf area as compared to University soil.

SHAPES AND SIZES OF POLLEN GRAINS OF SOME COMMON HERBS AND SHRUBS OF KARACHI

Toqeer Ahmed Rao, Moinuddin Ahmed, Abdul Hakeem Shaikh, Nasrullah Khan and Syed Sadruddin Hussain

Department of Botany Federal Urdu University, Gulshan-e-Iqbal, Karachi, Pakistan-75300Corresponding Author: toqeerrao@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

A palynological study of 29 common plant species representing 28 genera and belonging to 23 families present in Karachi has been carried out. This study is based on the flowering conditions of plants. The flowers were divided into two major groups i.e., plants with full flowering bloom and rare flowering in different months of the year. This study is the first phase of our research work and provides some basic information about the size and shape (under ordinary microscope) of some common pollen grains found in Karachi.

THE EFFECT OF AIR POLLUTION ON HUMAN BLOOD

1Dilshad Ahmed, 2Moinuddin Ahmed, 1Arif Zubair, 1Chaudary Afzal, 3Kanwal Nazim and 2Toqeer Ahmed Rao

1Department of Environmental Sciences, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Karachi.
2Department of Botany, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Karachi.
3Department of Zoology. Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Karachi.

ABSTRACT

The present investigations indicate that air pollution is associated with several chronic diseases. A prospective study was conducted to investigate changes in blood parameters in response to daily changes in air pollution in Karachi city. Several clinical visits were scheduled and blood parameters were measured in 64 males and 16 females during 2008-2009. Eighty samples of blood were collected from different areas of Karachi, classified on the basis of pollution such as highly polluted areas, moderate polluted and less polluted areas. The preliminary results suggested that air pollution is associated with several blood parameters which may cause unceasing diseases.

SOME WEEDS OF MAIN CASH CROPS OF PAKISTAN

Nasira Jabeen and Moinuddin Ahmed

Ecology and Dendrochronology Laboratory, Department of Botany,
Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Gulshan-e-Iqbal Campus,University Road, Karachi-75300, Pakistan.
Email:nj_shafiq@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Sugarcane, rice, wheat and cotton are the cash crop of Pakistan. These crops face the problem of weeds infestation during their growing period. Due to farmer’s ignorance and their unawareness about the weeds they do not remove the weeds from the fields; therefore crop yield and quality are adversely affected.

SIZE-PHYTOMASS ALLOMETRY IN SOME HALOPHYTIC OR SALT TOLERANT SPECIES OF KARACHI COAST, PAKISTAN

D. Khan1, S. Shahid Shaukat2 and M. Javed Zaki3

1Department of Botany, Government National College, Karachi, Pakistan.
2Institute of Environmental studies, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270, Pakistan.
3Department of Botany, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270, Pakistan.

ABSTRACT

Allometric equations were developed to estimate aboveground dry phytomass (AGDP) in some coastal herbaceous halophytic species of Karachi viz. Atriplex griffithii Moq. Cressa cretica L., Phragmites karka (Retz.) Trin ex Steud., Limonium stocksii (Boiss.) O. Ktze, and Urochondra setulosa (Trin.) C.E. Hubb. Best fit least square regression models were developed using height and crown diameter to estimate AGDP of individual plants. In case of P. karka, culm height, culm basal diameter or culm volume were employed to estimate phytomass of an individual culm.
The crown diameter was generally better predictor of phytomass than height. The inclusion of parameter of height as an independent variable along with crown diameter could not improve the estimation of phytomass significantly except in case of P. karka where substantial improvement in estimation of culm mass was recorded (24.3%) when height was included along with culm diameter in a natural log-log model of multiple correlation and regression. Quadratic (curvilinear) relationships between phytomass and crown diameter were significant in all plants. The quadratic equations were more or less as equally statistically efficient as multiple regression models in estimating phytomass in Atriplex, Cressa and Limonium. Culm phytomass in Phragmites and AGDP in Urochondra setulosa were, however, better estimated by multiple regression models with natural log-log transformed variables.

EFFECTS OF CHROMIUM, CADMIUM, LEAD AND ZINC ON GERMINATION, SEEDLING GROWTH AND PHENOL CONTENTS OF VIGNA UNGUICULATA (L.) WALP.

S. Shahid Shaukat1, Moazzam A. Khan1, Omm-E-Hany1, Seemi Aziz2, Sara Umair1, Azhar A. Khan 1 and M. Ahsanuddin3

1 Institute of Environmental Studies, University of Karachi
2 Department of Botany, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270
3 Department of Economics, University of Karachi, Karachi-75270

ABSTRACT

The effect of four heavy metals, including chromium, cadmium, lead and zinc were examined on germination, early seedling growth and soluble phenol content of cowpea Vigna unguiculata. The final seed germination percentage was significantly reduced by most of the heavy metals at 50ppm and 100ppm. Germination was suppressed by the metals in the order Cd> Cr> Pb> Zn. Both root and shoot growth of the seedlings were reduced by all the heavy metals tested. TL 50 values for Cd, Cr, Pb and Zn were 53,07, 55.86, 70.75 and 81.24, respectively. As a stress response, the soluble phenol content was remarkably elevated by the heavy metals at concentrations of 50ppm and 100ppm. Phenol accumulation due to heavy metals stress occurred in the order Cd> Cr> Pb> Zn. The mechanisms whereby heavy metals cause toxicity to plants are discussed.

 
Home  |  Aboutus  |  Editorial Board  |  Instruction  |  Contents  |  Subcribe  |  Feed Back
Copyright 2011 - 2012 IJBB. All rights reserved.
Design by Citi IT Solution